Undergraduate Academic Affairs


The integration of the liberal arts and career development is a major strength of Ashland University. Through what might be called a synthesis for learning, Ashland University has faced the challenge of, on the one hand, meeting discipline standards for certifications and keeping majors up to date while, on the other hand, preserving the liberal arts and allowing students a measure of flexibility in their course selection. The concept which has evolved contains three primary elements: core requirements, major/minor requirements, and elective courses.

Ashland University intends to liberate the minds of students and to challenge each student to reach their full potential.

Academic Affairs works to see that the teaching and program core of the institution allow and encourage that growth.

Academic Affairs is administered by the Provost through the Academic Council.

This catalog and listing of course offerings represent institutional policy and program requirements at the time of print. Students should contact their advisor to discuss any changes to programs or course offerings after print. Revisions to the printed catalog for academic policy changes are available on the Registrar’s Office web page at https://www.ashland.edu/registrar.

 Ashland University Student Learning Goals and Outcomes

  1. Intellectual Development

Students will analyze evidence, apply specialized knowledge, and think critically and creatively to solve problems.

Pertaining to specialized knowledge acquired through education or experience students will be able to:

  • Analyze a complex topic or issue by dividing it into its parts, identifying the parts and the relationship between them, and evaluating the quality of evidence used to support the topic/issue.

  • Synthesize issues, objects, or works in original ways that result in informed conclusions or judgements.

  • Formulate solutions using innovation, divergent thinking, or risk taking.

  1. Ethical Development                                                                    

Students will apply principles of integrity and ethical decision-making to address real-world issues.

Students will be able to:

  • Apply ethical perspectives/concepts to a real or hypothetical ethical question or issue.

  • Model integrity, honesty, and fairness in dealings with others and with confidential information.

  1. Civic Engagement

Students will apply knowledge, skills, and values in order to work, serve, and lead in their communities.

Students will be able to:

  • Apply knowledge from academic disciplines and other institutional experiences to a campus community/civic/societal issue or activity.

  • Articulate how to use one’s knowledge and skills to contribute in civic, work, or leadership roles.

  1. Global and Intercultural Competence

Students will exhibit competence for constructive engagement within global and intercultural contexts.

Students will be able to:

  • Analyze and explain the impact of culture and experience on one’s world view and behavior.

  • Describe themselves and their culture through the perception of others.

  • Critically analyze the complexity and interconnectedness of global processes

Provost

Dr. Amiel Jarstfer

Registrar

Mark Britton

206 Founders Hall

regis@ashland.edu

419.289.5057

College of Online and Adult Studies

Interim Dean

Shawn Orr

26 West Main Street

Ashland, Ohio 44805

sorr3@ashland.edu

The College of Arts and Sciences

Interim Dean

Daniel McDonald

Center for the Arts

dmcdona1@ashland.edu

419.289-5130

Assistant Dean

Dr. Cindy Moseman

210B Center for the Arts

cmoseman@ashland.edu

419.289.5293

Director University CORE

Dr. Greg McBrayer

125 Andrews

gmcbraye@ashland.edu

419.289.5380

Director, Online Applied Communication

Dr. Deleasa Randall-Griffiths

329 Center for the Arts

drandall@ashland.edu

419.289.5143

Director, Online Criminal Justice

TBD

Director, Center for Addictions, Counseling, and Human Services

Director of Marketing and Admissions

Director of Continuing Education

Alisha Dennis-Brinson

166 Schar

adennisb@ashland.edu

419.207.4994

Director of Curriculum and Assessment

Director of Grants 

Emma Kulbis

161 Schar

ekulbis@ashland.edu

419.207.5109

The Dauch College of Business and Economics

Dean

Dr. Elad Granot

101E Dauch College of Business and Economics

egranot@ashland.edu

419.289.5212

Associate Dean, MBA Chair

Dr. Raymond A. Jacobs

101C Dauch College of Business and Economics

rjacobs@ashland.edu

419.289.5931

Executive Director

Ronald Mickler, MBA Program

101K Dauch College of Business and Economics

rmickler@ashland.edu

419.289.5236

The Dwight Schar College of Education

Interim Dean

Dr. Stephen Denney

214 Dwight Schar College of Education

sdenney@ashland.edu

419.207.6296

Director of Quality Assurance and Accreditation

Dr. Peter Ghazarian

129 Dwight Schar College of Education

419-289-5339

pghazari@ashland.edu

Director of Field Experiences and Partnerships

Laura Kanney

239 Dwight Schar College of Education

419.289.5349

lkanney@ashland.edu

The Dwight Schar College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Dean

Dr. Carrie Keib

Mansfield Campus

1020 S. Trimble Road

ckeib@ashland.edu

419.521.6802

Ashland Theological Seminary

Seminary Dean

Dr. John Byron

ats-dean@ashland.edu

419.289.5722

Center Locations

Ashland (Main Campus) Center

Columbus Center

Elyria/Cleveland Center

Mansfield Center

Massillon/Stark Center

Southwest Center

The College of Arts and Sciences

Addictions, Counseling, and Human Services

majors - Associate of Arts with a concentration in Addictions Counseling

minors - addictions counseling

 

Art and Design

majors - art education, fine art

minors - art history, studio art

 

Biology/Toxicology

majors - biology (with the option of a concentration in forensic biology or the option of a concentration in medical laboratory sciences), biology/environmental science, life sciences education, toxicology

minors - biology, environmental science

 

Chemistry/Geology/Physics

majors - biochemistry, American Chemical Society (ACS)-certified chemistry, chemistry, chemistry/environmental science, forensic chemistry, integrated science education

minors - chemistry, environmental science, geology

 

Communication Studies

majors - applied communication, public relations & strategic communication, sport communication

minor – conflict resolution, public relations

graduate - Master of Arts in Corporate and Strategic Communication

 

Criminal Justice

majors - criminal justice, homeland security, Associate of Arts with a concentration in Criminal Justice

minors – conflict resolution, criminal justice, homeland security, sociology, social and community justice

  

Languages and Literature

majors - creative writing, English, integrated language arts education

minors - creative writing, English, Spanish

graduate – Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

 

General Studies

majors-Associate of Arts in general studies

Associate of Arts in general studies with a concentration in Business

 

History/Political Science

majors - history, integrated social studies education, international political studies, political science, political economy

minors - history, political science, classical civilization, political economy

graduate - Master of Arts in American History and Government,

Master of Arts with a Specialization in Teaching American History and Government

 

Interdisciplinary Studies

majors – interdisciplinary studies

 

Journalism and Digital Media

majors - digital media journalism, digital media production

minors - digital media journalism, digital media production

 

Mathematics/Computer Science

majors - actuarial science, computer science, cybersecurity, integrated mathematics education, mathematics, software design and development

minors - computer science, cybersecurity, mathematics, web technology

 

Multidisciplinary Studies

majors - multidisciplinary studies

 

Music

majors - music, music education

minors - applied music, music

 

Philosophy

majors – philosophy

minors - philosophy, ethics

 

Psychology

major - psychology

minors – psychology

 

Religion

major - religion

minors - ethics, religion, christian ministry

 

Social Work

major - social work

minors - child and family studies, social work

 

Theatre

minor - theatre

 

The Dwight Schar College of Nursing and Health Sciences

Health Sciences

major - dietetics, exercise science

 

Nursing

major - nursing

 

The Dauch College of Business and Economics

Accounting/MIS

majors - accounting, management information systems

minors- accounting, management information systems

 

Economics/Finance

majors - economics, finance

minors - business analytics, economics, finance

 

Management/International Business/Entrepreneurship/ Manufacturing Management/Supply Chain Mgt.

majors - business administration, business management, entrepreneurship, international business, manufacturing management/supply chain management

minors - business administration, business management, entrepreneurship, international business, supply chain management

graduate - Master of Business Administration

 

Marketing/Fashion Merchandising/Sport Management

majors - marketing, fashion merchandising, sport management

minors - coaching, fashion merchandising, marketing, sport management

 

The Dwight Schar College of Education

Teacher Education

majors - education studies

majors - primary grades/intervention dual program

majors - middle childhood (4-9)/intervention specialist (K-12)

majors - adolescent to young adult (7-12) [see departmental listings for majors],

majors - multi-age (PreK-12) [see departmental listings for majors]

majors - intervention specialist (mild-moderate, moderate-intensive, or dual license)

minors - technology, ece 4-5 generalist

Graduate

Master of Education, Doctor of Education in Leadership Studies

 

College of Online and Adult Studies

Center for English Studies

intensive English program (ACCESS)

major – Organizational Leadership, Organizational Training and Development

Graduate

Master of Education, Adult Education

 

Online Undergraduate Programs Offered

Associate of Arts in General Studies

Associate of Arts in General Studies with a concentration in Business

Associate of Arts with a concentration in Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Multidisciplinary Studies

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration

Bachelor of Arts in Applied Communication

Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies

 

Other Areas under Academic Affairs

Library

Registrar’s Office

The Honors Program

Regional Centers

Global Education Office

Center for Academic Success

Student Accessibility Center

 

Degrees Offered by Ashland University

Associate of Arts

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Fine Arts

Bachelor of Music

Bachelor of Science

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Education

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Social Work

 

Correctional Education Programs

Directors

Denise Justice - Executive Director of Correctional Education Operations

Cathy Britton - Director of Records and Advising

Mary Deloe - Director of Academic Services

Kelly Liocano - Executive Director of Financial Aid

Gary Pember - Director of Outreach

 Correctional Education Opportunities:

 Ashland University offers Pell Grant funded programs in multiple states in correctional institutions. The following degrees are currently offered to Correctional Education students:

  • Associate of Arts in General Studies

  • Associate of Arts in General Studies with a concentration in Business

  • Bachelor of Arts in Applied Communication

  • Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies

  • Bachelor of Science in Multidisciplinary Studies

 Face to Face learning: Ohio (select locations)

Online learning: AR, DC, FL, GA, KY, LA, MN, MO, ND, NM, NY, OH, WV

Faculty

Faculty who teach courses are not only graduates of a wide range of universities, but they also bring with them many years of non-university workplace experience. As a result, students are exposed to teacher-scholars who are also aware of the expectations of the workplace. Because of the nature of Ashland University, professors are not only expected to be experienced and continuously engaged in scholarly activity, but they are also required to be effective teachers. Ashland faculty are committed to preparing students to be competent and confident professionals. Faculty are involved in their students’ programs and; therefore, are available to help students gain valuable insights into the influences that shape their fields.

Ashland offers master's and doctoral degree programs on the main campus, online, and at approved off-campus centers. Regardless of the location in which the student takes course work, the student will experience the same curriculum and many of the same professors.

It is our hope that students will easily discover that Ashland’s motto, “Accent on the Individual,” applies equally to graduate and to undergraduate programs.

Special Academic Programs

Continuing Education

Continuing Education offers students and adults an opportunity to take credit courses and non-credit seminars, workshops and courses. Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are awarded for non-credit offerings, one CEU per 10 contact hours. Professional Development Units (PDUs) are offered for some workshops. Non-credit offerings include, but are not limited to, real estate licensing, project management, supervisor management, and social service. For more information, contact the Founders School.

Regional Centers Locations

  • Ashland (Main Campus) Center

  • Columbus Center

  • Elyria/Cleveland Center

  • Mansfield Center

  • Massillon/Stark Center

  • Southwest Center

Class Attendance and Preparation

Registration is required before attending any course. Students who need assistance with registration should contact the Registrar’s Office. Properly registered students are expected to attend all class times, including synchronous meeting times for online and hybrid classes.

Classification of Students

Semester hours completed

Freshman

0-29

Sophomore

30-59

Junior

60-89

Senior

90 and above

Graduate Coursework Opportunity

Students who meet college level criteria are eligible to register for up to and including 9 graduate credits to be applied directly to their undergraduate degree requirements. Student criteria for participation, set forth by each college, are senior status at the time of the course, 3.0 overall GPA and permission of Advisor, Chair and Dean of the student’s college. For specifics about this opportunity contact your advisor or an advisor in the Center for Academic Success; for specifics about charges and financial aid contact Student Accounts and Financial Aid respectively. All registrations are at the discretion of the graduate program director or Dean. Successfully completed coursework will have both undergraduate and graduate credit value.

Conference Courses

When a student is unable to take a course at its regularly scheduled time due to an unavoidable peculiarity in the student's program, the department may agree to offer the course on an individual (conference) basis. The course by conference form may be obtained from the Registrar’s Office and must be completed prior to registration. The following procedure is to be used:

  1. The student must obtain written permission from the dean of the appropriate college, the department chair of the appropriate department, the student's advisor and the instructor for the course to be taken by conference.

  2. The student must then present the form to the Registrar’s Office for processing and consent. All required parties must approve the request for a conference course in order for the student to be registered for the course.

Course Level

Courses numbered 100 and 200 are designed generally for freshmen, and courses numbered 300 and 400 are designed generally for sophomores, juniors and seniors.

Courses numbered 300 and 400 may have graduate students enrolled in them for graduate credit. These courses are co-numbered 500/600/700 and are cross-listed in the graduate course offerings of the College of Education, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Nursing and Health Sciences and the College of Business and Economics.

Discontinued Classes

The University reserves the right to discontinue classes which have insufficient enrollment.

Elective Internship Program

The opportunity for internship experience is available in many departments. Each department offering credit for internships has separate guidelines and requirements. See the department chair to begin the process.

The University criteria for students to receive credit for the program include the following:

  1. The elective internship experience must be in the student‘s major field or an allied field of study.

  2. The student must follow individual department internship guidelines to receive credit for internship experiences.

  3. Generally, elective internships are evaluated on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Exceptions may be made by individual departments.

  4. The student may apply no more than 16 credit hours in any internship experience toward the 120 semester hours graduation requirement.

Elective Service Learning Program

Service learning is a form of experiential education that engages the student in a meaningful application of academic knowledge in significant service to the community. Service learning is a course-based, credit-bearing educational experience and is designed to promote civic responsibility, diversify and expand the student environment, advance professional development, enhance critical thinking skills, and help to create citizens aware of their global responsibilities. It must include orientation or training specific to the service site, meaningful and engaging service, and a structured reflection.

  • Orientation/training familiarizes the student with the ideology of service learning, the service site and the expectations of the University, site supervisor and the professor.

  • Service must be meaningful and engaging. It must not simply fulfill a need in the community but should also challenge and engage the student beyond the everyday classroom experience.

  • Reflection is the purposeful consideration of the service experience with respect to the specific learning objective.

Integrated Service Learning (0 Credit Hour)

  1. The Service Learning experience is created and designed by the professor to be a requirement of the course and directly relates to course content. The course syllabus will state how the learning objectives of the service learning activity coincide with the learning objectives of the course.

  2. The student must sign up for the 0-credit service learning option concurrently with the corresponding service learning course.

  3. The service requirement will be no less than 10 hours and no more than 29.

  4. No extra credit hours will be awarded for the service.

Service Learning Outcomes

  1. Apply academic theories and information to actual situations.

  2. Reflect on the social and moral implications of education.

  3. Practice civic and social responsibility by serving others in the community and expressing concern for the welfare of others.

  4. Examine new identities and unfamiliar roles.

  5. Develop a conscious set of personal values and beliefs.

  6. Work with people of diverse backgrounds in to new environments.

University Criteria

  1. All service learning activities must include orientation, meaningful service and reflection exercise as described in the service learning definition.

  2. The service learning portion of all designated service learning courses (Plus One or Integrated Service Learning) will be evaluated satisfactory/ unsatisfactory (S/U). The course to which the service learning is attached will be graded according to the course criteria.

  3. All courses containing a service learning portion will be designated as such.

  4. Acknowledgment of participation in service learning will be indicated on the student's transcript.

  5. All students participating in service learning should be flexible and open to new experiences and environments.

  6. Students should be prepared to travel off campus.

  7. Service learning activities should create joint ventures between students, faculty members and the community.

 Plus One Credit Option (1 Credit Hour)

  1. The Plus One Credit Option must be tied to the academic content of a course with which it is taken. It is not a course in itself–one hour must be attached to an already existing course. The professor of the course must be involved in the development of the learning contract. The contract must state how the learning objectives of the service learning activity coincide with the learning objectives of the course.

  2. A student may receive no more than 3 service learning credit hours and only one credit per course. A minimum of 30 hours of service is required for one credit hour.

  3. The student must submit a Service Learning Contract to the Center of Community Service before beginning the experience and before registering for the elective credit. The student must be registered for the credit before the last day to add. Any exceptions to this policy are up to the discretion of the Center for Community Service and the Registrar’s Office.

  4. The service learning credit may not apply toward any major. The exception to that will be when a student has the permission of the Department Chair and the Dean of that College. Both will sign the learning contract and note for which major they are permitting the credit to count.

Independent Study Program

The opportunity for independent study is offered in each department. To take Independent Study 498 (1-8 semester hours), a student must obtain an Independent Study Request form from the Registrar’s Office or online at https://www.ashland.edu/regisrar/forms and complete it prior to registration.

Students must meet the following criteria to enroll:

  1. The study must be in the student's major field or an allied field of study.

  2. The student must have a 3.0 or better GPA both overall and in the major field.

  3. The student must have completed one half of the total semester hours within the major field.

  4. The student must have completed 60 semester hours of the total academic program.

  5. The student may apply no more than eight semester hours in Independent Study toward the 120 semester hours graduation requirement.

  6. Credit in Independent Study may be applied toward a major field requirement only upon the written approval of the department chair.

Change of Major

Students may elect to change or add majors or minors through the Registrar’s Office. All Major Change Forms require the signature of an advisor. Students may elect to advance in catalog year, however, they do not have the option to step back in catalog years.

Registration

All registrations are expected to take place during the regularly scheduled registration periods. This would include, but is not limited to, all course work that is independent study, internship, by conference.

The Registrar’s Office sets the drop/add deadlines. All students are responsible for the effect of registration changes to financial aid and student billing. Refer to the appropriate Financial Aid and Finance and Administration sections of this catalog for applicable policies.

Repeat Policy

If a student repeats a course because of receiving a "C-" or lower, the last grade received is the grade earned. All courses and grades remain on the official transcript; however, only the last grade will be used to determine the student's grade-point average. Repeat courses must be taken at Ashland University. Courses with grades higher than C- cannot be repeated for a grade or on an S/U basis unless noted in the course description as repeatable. A student may audit a course previously taken for a grade; however, the previous grade earned will remain on the transcript and will be used to determine the student's grade point average. Audit fees may apply.

Schedule Changes

Students are responsible for reporting all schedule changes to their academic advisor.

Special Group (SG) Studies

Special group (SG) studies are courses developed by faculty and students to meet special needs and interests. These courses are not included in the University catalog, but are listed in the semester schedules.

Student Load

An average schedule load of 15 semester hours for each of eight semesters will meet the graduation requirements.

Students may register for 19 semester hours without special permission. Twelve semester hours is considered full time during a regular term for an undergraduate student. Students are restricted to a maximum summer course load of 6 semester hours per session and a total of 15 semester hours per summer.

Approval for enrollment beyond 19 semester hours spring or fall and 15 semester hours summer is required. Students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better may register for up to 21 hours per semester with approval from the student's advisor and chair of the student's major department. Approval for enrollment over 21 hours is required from the student's advisor, chair of the student's major department, and dean. Non-probationary sophomore, junior, and senior students in the Honors Program with an AU GPA of at least 3.5 may register for up to 21 hours of course credit without seeking approval.

It shall be the responsibility of the student to resolve schedule conflicts resulting from overloads. Credit in music ensemble may be added to the scheduled load without being counted as an excessive academic load.

Medical Withdrawal

In the event that a student is unable to complete the semester due to a medical condition that prohibits making up missed work, a withdrawal from all courses that semester may be processed providing that the following conditions are met:

  1. Class absences and missed work can be directly attributed to the medical condition.

  2. A qualified health professional verifies in writing that the medical condition prohibits completion of the semester requirements in one of two ways.

  • A "non-specific" medical withdrawal notice should be presented in writing to the Registrar’s Office. This medical notice (signed by a physician) should state that a medical condition prohibits completion of the semester requirements; and, assign a date of condition onset (to verify times classes were missed).

  • A notice of "specific" diagnostic information including all recommendations must be sent to the Health Center Director or Director of Psychological Counseling Services, as warranted. This is to ensure confidentiality and coordinate any recommended treatment or follow-up in the event of readmission.

  1. The medical withdrawal process is initiated by the student, the physician, and/or the parent/guardian, not AU.

  2. The medical condition fits in one of the following categories: medical illness; mental illness (must include date of psychiatric hospitalization and date of clinical assessment); drug or alcohol addiction; or surgery.

All medical withdrawals need to be initiated by contacting the Registrar’s Office within 60 days of the end of the grading period. Once the Registrar’s Office has the documentation to support the withdrawal, a "W" will be assigned and the faculty will be notified. Any refunds will be determined based on the effective date of withdrawal. Please refer to the refund policy in Undergraduate Finance and Administration section.

Readmission after Medical Withdrawal

A notice of "specific" diagnostic information, as mentioned above, including all recommendations as they apply to readmission must be sent to the Health Center Director or Director of Psychological Counseling Services, as warranted. This is to ensure confidentiality and coordinate any recommended treatment or follow-up. Until this is complete, no readmission can occur.

Grade Reports

Final grades are reported at the close of each term (available on Self Service) and become a part of the student's permanent record. These grades determine academic status, i.e., "good standing," "probation," or "dismissal."

It is the responsibility of the student to report to the Registrar’s Office any discrepancy on their grade reports within 60 days of the end of the grading period.

At the mid-point of each regular semester, a report will be made by the instructor to a student receiving a "C-" or lower in a course. This information is used for advising purposes and is not a part of the student's permanent record.

Student Complaint Procedures

The Ashland University (AU) Student Complaint Policy is available to students who wish to have a concern resolved regarding a process or person of the university community not covered by existing policies (i.e., grade appeals).  The objective of the AU Student Complaint Policy is to resolve concerns as quickly and efficiently as possible at the level closest to the student.  This policy provides two avenues for pursuing a complaint: An Informal Resolution Procedure and a Formal Resolution Procedure. Students may utilize either or both procedures.

Informal Resolution Procedure

Students are encouraged to attempt to resolve a problem whenever possible by discussing it with the person with whom they are having the problem. Requesting an appointment with the staff or faculty member to discuss the matter in a calm and mature fashion is always the first step to trying to resolve a dispute. For example, if a student has concerns related to classroom situations or administrative actions, he/she should contact the faculty or staff member(s) with whom he/she has a conflict. It may be possible to resolve the concerns without the need for formal institutional action. However, if the problem is not resolved through this action, the student should then contact the faculty member’s department chair, or the staff person’s supervisor. If the problem is not resolved satisfactorily, or if it cannot be resolved by contacting the faculty/staff member(s) or their supervisor/administrator, or if the student decides for whatever reason that she or he is not able to resolve the situation in this manner, or if the student is unsure to whom the concern should be addressed, the student should proceed to the Formal Resolution Procedure.

Formal Resolution Procedure

A formal complaint is in writing and sets forth a statement of the issue, the University policy or procedures violated, and the specific remedy sought.  The complaint must be submitted using the on-line form.  

Level 1

Absent extraordinary circumstances, the person, normally a Dean or Director, to whom the complaint has been submitted conducts, within seven (7) business days of receiving the complaint, a formal conference with the student, permitting her or him to provide any necessary relevant information. The Dean or Director confers with the other person or persons involved and conducts an additional investigation as he or she deems necessary.  Absent extraordinary circumstances, a written recommendation is sent within seven (7) business days of the first formal conference.  The recommendation is sent to the student and the other involved person or persons. The written recommendation states the background information, the rationale for the recommendation, and the recommended remedy, if any. Copies of the original complaint and the written recommendation are kept in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness for a minimum of five years.

Level 2

If the complaint is not resolved in level 1, the student or one of the other involved parties may, with fourteen (14) business days of receipt of the level 1 recommendation, appeal to the direct supervisor of the person who wrote the recommendation. Absent extraordinary circumstances, the supervisor will review the case and render a decision to the student within fourteen (14) business days of receipt of the appeal or complaint.  In cases of appeals to level 2, copies of the original complaint and the level 1 and 2 written recommendations are kept in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness for a minimum of five years.

Level 3

Except in the case of a complaint against the President, where the Board of Trustees has final authority, appeals of the level 2 recommendation are submitted to the President within fourteen (14) business days.  The President makes the final decision.  Absent extraordinary circumstances, the President's written decision is sent to the student and other parties within fourteen (14) business days of receiving the level 3 appeal.  In cases of appeals to level 3, copies of the original complaint, the previous written recommendations, and the final decision are kept in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness for a minimum of five years.

To file a complaint, please use the Student Complaint Form

Ohio Residents’ Student Complaint Procedure

For Ohio residents, complaints not resolved at the institutional level can be filed utilizing the Ohio Department of Higher Education’s non-SARA consumer complaint procedure and online form. Contact information to the Ohio Department of Higher Education and link to the online form may be found below:

Ohio Department of Higher Education
25 South Front St
Columbus, OH 43215
Phone: 614.466.6000

Ohio Department of Higher Education External Link

Student complaints not resolved at the institutional level can also be submitted to the:

Higher Learning Commission
230 South LaSalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, Illinois 60604-1411
Phone: 800.621.7440

Higher Learning Commission External Link

 NC SARA/Online Student Complaint Process Link

Prior Learning Credit

Prior learning credit is accepted from recognized institutions and organizations based upon standard policies and practices in higher education. At Ashland University, prior learning may be defined as college-level learning achieved outside the traditional college classroom "prior to" any college coursework in that subject area. Prior learning is distinguished from prior experience by the key word "learning." Prior experience, while it is important, will not necessarily be equivalent to prior learning.

Students achieve competencies through workshops, seminars, personal or professional opportunities, and/or independent study. Prior Learning Credit (PLC) is academic credit awarded for college-level learning obtained outside the traditional college classroom which can be verified by either an academic transcript from an accredited undergraduate institution or via equivalencies determined by the American Council of Education.

A maximum of 32 undergraduate semester hours credit may be granted and a processing/recording fee may be charged.

Common forms of PLC accepted by Ashland University:

  • Standardized examinations: Advanced Placement (AP); College Level Examination Program (CLEP); Chauncey Group International (DSST Program), formerly DANTES

  • Military; American Council on Education (ACE); professional licensures

  • Corporate and professional training which demonstrates college-level learning

  • Credit by examination – Enrolled students may obtain credit by examination in any required course. Proficiency must be demonstrated prior to the student's last registration before graduation. Approval of Department Chair, Dean and Instructor must be given using the Credit by Examination Form through the Registrar’s Office. No such application will be considered for any course which the student has previously taken or in any course for which a waiver has been previously granted. A grade of "B" of better must be obtained on the test to receive course credit; however, a grade of "S" will be entered on the student's record. A processing/recording fee will be charged. See Fees and Charges brochure for details.

  • Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) – a portfolio that includes learning narratives and a petition for credit using a specified format may be submitted by admitted students for review. A faculty member qualified as an Ashland University PLA Assessor will review the portfolio against a Faculty Senate Prior Learning Committee approved rubric and make credit recommendations to the registrar based for qualified learning experiences. A portfolio assessment fee will be added to the student’s account and must be paid prior to assessment. The PLA Coordinator assists students through the portfolio submission process.

When considering Prior Learning Assessment credit and transfer credit which reflects the same course work or student learning outcomes, credit from regionally accredited institutions shall take priority for transcripted values.

Transcripts

A copy of a student's academic record (official transcript) is available from the Registrar’s Office, Founders Hall, upon receipt of a written request and the required fee. Official transcripts may also be ordered online through the National Student Clearinghouse website. Official transcripts may not be available until after the final grading of that semester and will not be issued if there is an unmet financial obligation to the University.

Pre-Professional Programs

Ashland University will assist students to meet the preparatory professional requirements of the schools they wish to attend. It is the student's responsibility to make early application to the schools of their choice. The following are the minimum course requirements for pre-professional training in the areas indicated. It is recommended that students contact professional schools that they are interested in attending to be sure that their admission requirements are properly met. Students should also discuss their professional ambitions with their advisors in order to get recommendations of courses that will best prepare them for their choice of programs. Students interested in the health sciences can join our student-led Pre-Health club and campus chapter of the American Medical Association.

Pre-Law

The study of law requires a variety of skills, including critical reasoning, analytical reading, clear writing and self-discipline.  Good legal practice requires an appreciation of history, social and political institutions and, in general, a developed understanding of human nature.  Those approaching a profession in law should possess a morally serious character, since their actions affect the lives of many people.

Students seeking entry into the legal profession are encouraged to peruse a variety of majors and minors in preparation for this endeavor, including but not limited to, the study of liberal arts and business.  For this reason, Ashland University does not offer a Pre-Law major or minor, but does offer a minor in Business Law or a Legal Studies Track within the Criminal Justice Major.  Students are encouraged to contact one of the pre-law advisors:  Daniel Sullivan in the College of Business and Economics or Marc Hedrick in the Criminal Justice Department in order to further define their course of study.

Pre-Art Therapy

Students interested in Pre-Art Therapy should take a combination of courses found in the Department of Art and Design and the Department of Psychology. Typical requirements for graduate programs in Art Therapy and Counseling include:

  • 18 semester hours in studio art to include: Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture

  • 12 semester hours in psychology:

General Psychology

Developmental Psychology

Personality

Abnormal Psychology

  • Working with people in a human service context (e.g., through an internship) is also recommended.

  • These requirements can be completed by earning Bachelor of Arts degrees in both Fine Arts and Psychology. The completion of both degrees is possible within a typical 4- year framework.

Pre-Dentistry

For students interested in Pre-Dentistry, a major in biology, toxicology, biochemistry, forensic chemistry, or chemistry is recommended. Minimum course requirements for admission to dental school typically include:

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • CHEM 307/308 Organic Chemistry I & II

  • MATH 205/206 Calculus or MATH 201/202 Applied Calculus

  • PHYS 205/206 University Physics or PHYS 201/202 General Physics

  • Additional upper level courses in biology and chemistry (specific recommendations available from the departments)

Students must maintain a competitive GPA and perform well on the DAT to be considered competitive for admission to dental school.

Pre-Medical Laboratory Science

This program is designed to prepare students for acceptance into a school of medical laboratory science following the completion of three years of undergraduate coursework.  Ashland University maintains 3+1 partnerships with the Cleveland Clinic School of Medical Laboratory Science and the Akron Cooperative Medical Laboratory Science Program at Akron Children’s Hospital.

Following three years of coursework at Ashland University and subsequent completion of the medical laboratory science program at the Cleveland Clinic or Akron Children’s Hospital, the student will be granted the baccalaureate degree from Ashland University and will be prepared to take the MLS licensing exam. Minimum course requirements recommended prior to beginning a medical laboratory science program include:

Ashland University core requirements

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • BIO 303 Genetics

  • BIO 340 Microbiology

  • BIO 429 Biochemistry

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • CHEM 307/308 Organic Chemistry I & II

  • MATH 108 Introductory Statistics

  • MATH 201 Applied Calculus I

Pre-Medicine

For students interested in Pre-Medicine, a major in biology, toxicology, biochemistry, chemistry, forensic chemistry, or health sciences programs is recommended. Minimum course requirements for admission to medical school typically include:

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • MATH 205/206 Calculus

  • PHYS 205/206 University Physics or PHYS 201/202 General Physics

  • Additional upper level courses in biology and chemistry (specific recommendations available from the departments)

Several factors, including coursework, grade point average, and MCAT performance contribute to a competitive application to medical school.

Pre-Optometry

For students interested in Pre-Optometry, a major in biology is recommended. Minimum course requirements for admission to a school of optometry typically include:

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • MATH 205/206 Calculus or MATH 201/202 Applied Calculus

  • PHYS 205/206 University Physics or PHYS 201/202 General Physics

  • Additional upper level courses in biology and chemistry (specific recommendations available from the Department of Biology/ Toxicology)

Students must maintain a competitive GPA and perform well on the OAT to be considered competitive for admission to optometry school.

Pre-Pharmacy

For students interested in Pre-Pharmacy, a major in biology, toxicology, biochemistry, forensic chemistry, or chemistry is recommended. Minimum course requirements for admission to a school of pharmacy should include:

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • BIO 325/326 Anatomy and Physiology I & II

  • BIO 340 Microbiology

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • CHEM 320 Quantitative Analysis

  • MATH 108 Introductory Statistics

  • MATH 205/206 Calculus or MATH 201/202 Applied Calculus

  • PHYS 205/206 University Physics or PHYS 201/202 General Physics

  • Additional course recommendations are available from the Department of Biology/Toxicology and Chemistry/Geology/Physics

Pre-Physician Assistant

For students interested in Pre-Physician Assistant, a major in biology, biochemistry or toxicology is recommended. Minimum course requirements for admission to a school of physician assistant typically include:

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • BIO 303 Genetics

  • BIO 325/326 Anatomy and Physiology I & II

  • BIO 340 Microbiology

  • BIO 425 Advanced Human Physiology

  • BIO 340 Microbiology

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • CHEM 307/308 Organic Chemistry I & II

  • Additional course recommendations are available from the Department of Biology/Toxicology and Chemistry/Geology/Physics

Additional requirements for acceptance to a physician assistant program usually include health care experience in a clinical setting that can be acquired through shadowing and internship experience as well as work as a state tested nursing assistant.

Pre-Physical Therapy

For students interested in Pre-Physical Therapy, a major in biology or one of the health sciences majors is recommended. Minimum course requirements for admission to a school of physical therapy typically include:

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • BIO 325/326 Anatomy and Physiology I & II

  • BIO 425 Advanced Human Physiology

  • BIO 340 Microbiology

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • ES 190 Anatomy & Physiology for the Exercise Sciences

  • ES 308 Kinesiology

  • ES 309 Physiology of Exercise

  • MATH 108 Introductory Statistics

  • MATH 201 Applied Calculus I

  • PSYC 101 General Psychology

  • SOC 111 Principles of Sociology

  • Additional upper level courses in biology, physical education, and other departments (specific recommendations available from the Department of Biology/Toxicology)

Additional requirements for acceptance to a physical therapy program usually include experience and exposure to physical therapy through direct association with a licensed physical therapist in a clinical setting. Credit for this may be received through BIO 493 Professional Internship. Contact Chair of the Biology Dept. for more information.

Pre-Seminary

See Department of Religion for information.

Pre-Veterinary Medicine

For students interested in Pre-Veterinary Medicine, a major in biology, toxicology, biochemistry, forensic chemistry, or chemistry is recommended. Minimum course requirements for admission to a school of veterinary medicine typically include:

  • BIO 201 Molecular & Cellular Basis of Life

  • BIO 202 Organisms, Adaptation, & Diversity

  • CHEM 103/104 General Chemistry I & II

  • CHEM 307/308 Organic Chemistry I & II

  • MATH 205/206 Calculus

  • PHYS 205/206 University Physics or PHYS 201/202 General Physics

  • Additional upper level courses in biology and chemistry (specific recommendations available from the departments)

Students must maintain a competitive GPA and perform well on the GRE or MCAT to be considered competitive for admission to a school of veterinary medicine.

Affiliate Programs

Ashland University has affiliate programs with a number of institutions. A student who enters one of these programs at Ashland and who fulfills the institutional requirements for graduation, as well as the program of the cooperating institution, will receive the baccalaureate degree from Ashland University and the professional certificate or degree from the cooperating school or university if applicable.

Students enrolled in study abroad or affiliate programs are not eligible for Ashland University grants or scholarships.

For more information, see the chair of the department offering the affiliate program.

FASHION MERCHANDISING - Department of Marketing /Fashion Merchandising

  • Fashion Institute of Technology, New York City

  • Paris Fashion Institute

Four Year Graduation Guarantee

Students entering as freshmen beginning the fall 2012 semester will have the opportunity to elect a Four Year Graduation Guarantee program. This program guarantees that, provided all academic, advising, and financial guidelines are met by the student, if a degree is not achieved in eight consecutive fall and spring semesters, Ashland University will pay up to one additional year of tuition in order that the degree may be obtained. Students will have an opportunity to apply for this program through the Registrar’s Office by submitting an application along with a four year plan. Students are restricted to one comprehensive major or one major and one minor/endorsement for their Four-Year Graduation Guarantee Program.

As not all degree plans are eligible for the guarantee, approval is required by the Registrar’s Office for each application. Students accepted for the plan will be required to sign a Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act waiver for release of student academic and financial information to their parent or guardian.

This guarantee does not apply to students who elect to extend their studies beyond eight semesters to take advantage of research, license, endorsement, minor program opportunities and/or athletic eligibility. Students are expected to adhere to all aspects of the Four Year Graduation Policy found by visiting https//ashland.edu/registrar.

 Three Year Degree Program

Students planning to complete one of the degree programs listed below in three years should confer with their advisor, plan accordingly, and file a Major Change Form with the Registrar’s Office. Provided that students do not utilize their 19 credits during each of the fall and spring terms, a two credit award will be granted for billing purposes for summer courses when registered for the planned six summer credits.

  • Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

  • Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

  • Bachelor of Science in Psychology

  • Bachelor of Arts in Music

  • Bachelor of Arts in Fine Art

  • Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration

  • Bachelor of Arts in Economics